Old_City_(Jerusalem)

Before the King Daud (R) Jerusalem’s victory in the 11th century BC, the city was the residence of the Zebusians. This city was protected by a strong city. The city governed by King Dawood (R), which is known as the City of Dawood, is located in the southwest of the old city wall. His son extended the wall of King Sulaiman. Then, in 440 BCE, after the Persia, Nehemiah came back from Babylon and rebuilt it. In 41 BCE 44 AD, Agrippa King Agrippa built a new city wall called the Third Dwell. During the reign of Khalifa Umar ibn al-Khattab in 6th or 637, the Muslims conquered Jerusalem and the Khalifah Umar included it in the Muslim empire. He signed contracts with the promise of safety of the residents of the city. After the siege of Jerusalem, Welcome to the Zulfionian Caliph Umar. Because a poor but upright and powerful person will appear as a protector and ally of the Christians in Jerusalem in a Bible prophecy familiar to the Church of Jerusalem. Such was the reference. Saphronius believed that the hero of the simple warrior Umar fulfilled this prediction. The Patriarch of Alexandria visited the Uthur Church of the Holy Seppacht written by Uticaas and sat in the courtyard. At the time of prayer, he went out of the church and prayed that nobody would later convert this church into a mosque after using the reason for his prayer. He also mentioned that Umar wrote an order and handed it over to Petrarch. In this, Utkiyyas mentioned in his writings that the Muslims were forbidden to pray at that place. During the first Crusades in 1099, the European Christian army occupied Jerusalem and on 2 October 1187, it was ruled by Sultan Salahuddin Ayubi until it was conquered. He allowed the Jews to live in the city. In 1219, the Sultan of Damascus destroyed the wall of Muazzzim city. In accordance with agreement with Egypt in 1243, Jerusalem was captured by the second Frederick of Germany. In 1239, he rebuilt the wall. But the era of Kerak’s Amir, Dawood, destroyed them. In 1243 Jerusalem again came under the control of the Christians and the walls were reformed. In 1244, Khoerijmiyat Tatarra captured the city, and the Sultan Malik alamuatam broke the city wall. As a result the city becomes defunct and the city’s status is threatened.

800px-EmperorSuleiman

The current walls were built in 1538 by the first Sulaiman of the Ottoman Empire sultan. The walls are about 4.5 km. Or 2.8 miles long and 5 to 15 meters high, about 16 to 49 feet high and 3 meters around 10 feet thick. In all, in the old city there are 43 protected towers and 11 gates. Seven of them are currently open.

তুষারাবৃত পুরনো শহর, ২০০৮

Snowy Old Town, 2008

In the 1980’s, Jordan proposed first to enroll the old city as the UNESCO World Heritage Site. It was listed in 1981. Jordan again asked again to consider it as a risky World Heritage Site in 1992. The United States is opposed to this request, not to mention Jordan’s jurisdiction. It also mentions that Israel’s consent is needed because they are directly controlling Israel. In 2011, UNESCO stated that they deemed East Jerusalem a part of the occupied Palestinian territories, and to resolve the position of Jerusalem permanently.

Kotel_1967

View of the Quotel Empty Square, July 1967

During the Crusader Kingdom Jerusalem, there were four photographs in the old city of Jerusalem. Each of them was located on one side. The walls located at present are built by the first Sulaiman, and eleven of its gates. But seven are open. Until 1887 the gates were closed before the sunset and the sun was set during the sunset. According to the following chart, the gates are known by various names. Names are introduced through various historical periods and through different communities.

পশ্চিম দেয়ালের চত্বর

The square of the west wall

 

There was a small Moroccan mansion in the old town. A week after the end of the six-day war, it was destroyed to provide more facilities to visitors to the West Wall. The part that was not destroyed is now part of the Jewish settlement. From then on, the non-Muslims could go to the Temple Mount with the Maghrib bridge. This is the only way for non-Muslims.